Second Grade Math Warm-Ups: Week of May 9-13, 2016

This week was relatively normal, but somehow I only have 3 warm-ups to share.Enjoy! Please comment when you’re finished reading and let us know what you think!

Monday

Yep, we’re still working on subtraction around here.  It’s kind of an all-the-time thing because as soon as you abandon it for longer than a few days everyone forgets how to do it!  This time I gave them the answer and the strategy and had them analyze it for me.  We had a great conversation about why this problem was most efficiently solved by making an easier problem (rather than say, the traditional algorithm or splitting and using a number line to model it) because the second number was close to a hundred.  This made it SUPER easy to subtract in just two easy steps.

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Friday

Um, yeah…not really sure what happened that our warm-ups are just from Monday and Friday.  We must have been really busy this week.  Hope I remember what we did so I can tell you about it here. LOL

Friday we actually had a bonus math warm-up because our Writing Warm-Up led us to figuring out some math and making a graph.  And yes, I ran out of paper.  We improvised. 🙂

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We are also still working on multiplication, including writing an equation and drawing a model.  This one was cool, because as often happens, kiddos thought of a model that I hadn’t: showing the repeated addition on a number line.  This was a great conversation about which number meant what in the problem (the number of groups vs. the number in the group), and we also talked about how you could flip the problem around and have the same answer.

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Second Grade Math Warm-Ups: Week of May 2-6, 2016

I am a little bit late–sorry!  I forgot a few important pictures that I needed in order to properly share.  Hopefully you’ll still read (and learn with us!).  🙂

Monday

There’s not a lot to explain behind this one except that I wanted to continue to focus on the idea of a fraction being EQUAL pieces, not just the number of pieces in the denominator.  As you can see in many of the post-its, most kiddos understand this when they partition the cookie cake for 4 people.

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Tuesday

As I mentioned with a problem or two last week, kiddos are to have a basic foundation of groups and arrays to help them with further multiplication concepts in 3rd grade.  We played a game called Circles and Stars last week, which is basically where they roll a dice twice, once drawing circles and then filling each with the 2nd number’s worth of stars.  Then they figure out an equation to go with the model as well as how many stars there are altogether.  I wanted to build on this idea and see what they’d do with a new problem.  As is seen on their answers, they almost all drew circles with stars (or dots).  I wanted to help them see the same idea as an array, as well, so I connected the equation to brownies (so they pan/array would make more sense).

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Wednesday

Somewhere I had saved a picture of my original problem which looked like this (the purple writing on the chart): If I had a pan of brownies that had 7 brownies on one side and 5 brownies on the other, how many would I have?  When I looked at the answers, I was completely baffled as to why so many had answered 6X2=12.  We had a great decision about how they used 7+5=12 and then made a multiplication equation that matched.  There were also some pretty interesting models/pictures of the equation, too, so I drew an array to show what I meant.  Once they saw it, they could see what I meant, but we agreed that the problem I had written didn’t lead them to that understanding.  I asked them to help me figure out how I could have better written the problem so that they could have seen what I meant.  We worked to revise the question so it made more sense.  This was a GREAT conversation both about math and revision, which is something Rm. 202 friends know happens ALL THE TIME, not just in writing.  They did a super job of helping me redesign the warm-up so that it better matched what I wanted to know.

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Now it reads: If I had a rectangular pan of brownies that had 7 columns of brownies on the long side of the pan, and 5 rows of brownies on the other, how many would I have in the whole pan?  Draw a picture.   Great work on the writing and the math, Rm. 202 friends!

Thursday

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Friday

We’re still working on many concepts all at once, and solidifying our understanding of them.  Love my little speech bubble?  We always talk about how the numbers in the problem scream at us to tell us which strategy is most efficient for them, so it just seemed fitting. 😀

 

Second Grade Math Warm-Ups: Week of April 25-29, 2016

We have been on a roll with warm-ups lately, and maybe since we’re still talking about many different things, they’ve given us a way to keep all the balls in the air.  Love that.  Enjoy! 🙂

Monday

One of the topics we’re working on right now is the foundation of fractions, and understanding about equal parts.  This warm-up led to a GREAT conversation about how 1/5 is always a 1/5, but the actual portion that is being considered changes based on the whole.  Oh, and we were all hungry when we were finished. 🙂

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Tuesday

It seems like addition and subtraction is a never-ending concept with 2nd graders, and we’re still working on it.  Oh well, as long as it takes.  School year’s not over yet and they can get it! Here was another opportunity to practice.

Wednesday

Ok, so I need to explain that that picture is a pizza, not a target.  It’s based on a picture we had looked at the day before in a math conversation.  It was based on an 8-slice pizza and how we could share it fairly if twice as many people showed up for our party.  This was the way one group suggested we do it, and we had to discuss whether we agreed if it was fair.  Which piece would you want? 🙂

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Thursday

We had a FABULOUS walking field trip on Thursday at the time we normally do math warm-ups, so didn’t have one that day.  We had a great day in the park and a movie instead! 🙂 (Don’t worry–it was connected to our curriculum!)

Friday

Another topic (which I found a way to weave into this conversation, too!) is the foundation of multiplication.  We told many stories of groups of things with this one.  Great thinking, Rm. 202 kiddos!

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Second Grade Math Warm-Ups: Week of February 1-5, 2016

This was finally a semi-normal week: we had 5 school days and no “extra” stuff to mess with the schedule.  It was also the first week in a long time that we had a math warm-up every morning, which means I have lots of problems to share! I even found a couple of odd ones from last week–which was NOT a normal week because of the 100th Day and a 1/2 day on Friday.

These last few weeks we’ve been working on money, so all of these relate to that topic.  They are progressive, from Monday to Friday, and speak to the new skill/concept I was planning to cover that day; some kiddos really had no idea how to do this when i asked them to think about it in the morning and so had to give-it-a-go, or work with a partner. These were definitely questions where I saw many post-its that said, “I’m not sure yet but what I think is…”  (The extra two I’m sharing this week are related to our muffin challenge from the 100th Day.  Be sure to check out that post for more info!).

Last Week Muffin Problems

 

This week’s money problems:

Monday

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 Tuesday

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Thursday

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Friday

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Rethinking Multiplication Strategies

First of all, I know.  It’s been forever.  Man, I’ve been saying that a lot lately.  All I can do is apologize, though, and ask that you’ll kindly keep reading.   Life is nuts these days. 🙂

So…we are just about at the end of a study of multiplication and this year I’m asking my friends to think in a different way about the word efficient when it comes to multiplying.

Based on our district rubrics, which have recently been rewritten based on work related to Common Core and an updated curriculum, the standard for 5th grade has changed.  Instead of just being able to use the traditional algorithm, students are expected to be able to fluently use a variety of strategies.  But get this: the strategy they choose to use should be based on the numbers in the problem, rather than personal preference or the strategy they know best.  WHAT??!! I seriously have some friends whose heads might explode.

But it’s not really their fault, I guess, because for years the algorithm was the goal.  And once they learned how to use it, that’s what they stuck with and used every time.  For years, we (or they) saw the other strategies as lower-level–ones used by friends who didn’t yet “get” how the algorithm worked.

District Math Rubric for Multiplication

District Math Rubric for Multiplication

Now we’re thinking more about how mathematicians should be able to be flexible with their thinking, to use place value correctly and to explain their reasoning based on what they know about numbers.  This doesn’t mean that the algorithm isn’t something kids should know how to do, but that it’s not the only thing they should know how to do.  I mean think about it in the real world: there are times when you have to be able to do math in your head, in an efficient way–without paper.  The algorithm doesn’t really fit into that model.

So what does this look like in our room?

First of all, here’s an anchor chart that now hangs in our room (made based on our knowledge of how to solve multiplication problems):

Classroom anchor chart for multiplication strategies

Classroom anchor chart for multiplication strategies

While I don’t have any pictures of the math warm-ups we’re doing right now, this is where many of our opportunities come to try out this thinking.  The problem today, for example looked like this:

Math Warm-Up for October 14

Math Warm-Up for October 14

There are obviously (based on the chart) multiple ways to do this problem.  But based on the numbers (which were chosen on purpose), the strategy that makes the most sense is to either use splitting or a close 10 to solve the problem.  That way, you can solve 75 X 20 and 75 X 3 and then add them together, which can easily be done in your head–without paper.  If you chose to use the algorithm (which most would do–even most adults!) you’d have to do 5 X 3, then 70 X 3, 5 X 2 and then 70 X 2 and add it all together–many more steps than the other strategy.

So while this is still a little tricky for some friends, it will get easier with time.   We just need some more practice. 🙂

What strategy would you have used to solve 75 X 23?  Do you know more than one strategy to multiply?  Is the traditional algorithm your “go to” strategy?  I know my 5th grade mathematicians would love to hear your answers!

 

 

Math Warm-Ups Sept 4-7, 2012

So after I posted about our Morning Math Warmups last week, I figured I would start doing that every week.  It will be great to see all of them once we’re finished this year.  We would really appreciate it if you followed along with our learning this year, and even comment with your own answers.  We could learn from you!

Since Monday was Labor Day, there are only four this week:

 

 

 

 

How would you answer these?  What warmups would you use for factors and multiples? Leave us a comment!